As we prepare for our upcoming seasonal retreat, we are contemplating the Water element. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the Kidneys are the yin organs associated with Water and with our Essence, Our True Nature. One of the many ways an imbalance in Water shows up in an individual is with a lack of purpose, a sense of malaise, a lack of motivation. One wonders, especially during winter and early spring, what is my purpose in life?

Thankfully, there are several practices we can draw on to support and build our kidney energy and therefore restore balance to our Water element. One way is to incorporate nourishing herbal infusions as a daily tonic. A favorite Kidney tonic is Nettles (Urtica dioica) also known as Stinging Nettles. Nettles are ubiquitous in gardens and waysides from Maine to Florida and New York to California. Maybe an indicator of how many people benefit from this tonic herb?

Another Kidney tonic, an adaptogen, which enhances the body’s natural response to stress, is Tulsi (Oscimum sanctum) or Holy Basil which is a sacred plant in India and is planted near temples on the Indian subcontinent. Tulsi is a powerful antioxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-inflammatory herb. And the smell of the plant and it’s essential oils is divine. Try making a delicious herbal infusion with Holy Basil.

Whole Foods, like whole herbs, are recommended to help balance the Kidneys. Specifically, black-colored foods and foods with the salty taste are beneficial to the Kidneys. These foods include seaweeds and other sea foods that have been marinated in the bounty of natural sea salts for millennia. Legumes, like Kidney beans, and other black foods, such as black sesame seeds, black beans and black walnuts are tonifying to the Kidneys.

Restorative Practices, like Yoga, Meditation, Tai Chi, and Deep Rest, especially during the hours of 3-7am and 3-7pm are recommended to restore our Kidney energy. Learn to practice restorative yoga, specifically tailored for this time of year and more practices to balance your energy during winter and early spring by attending our upcoming retreat.

In the meantime, try incorporating some of these practices now. And ask yourself, “What is your life’s purpose?” Can you articulate it? Or write it down? Continue to practice these three recommendations for the next week. Ask yourself again “What is Your life’s purpose?” Try again in one month. One Year. “What is your life’s purpose?” Has your answer has changed? Has your answer become more clear? “What IS Your Life’s Purpose?”

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